September 2009 Archives

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The word arpeggio means: to play the notes in a chord one at a time right after another - either ascending or descending (up or down). The origin Italian, from arpeggiare "play the harp," from arpa harp. 

Buy combining strumming (all notes at once) and arpeggio picking you can create a much more interesting and musical sound.

To make these examples easy I will number the right hand fingering (left hand for left handers) as follows:                   Thumb = T - first finger = 1 - index finger = 2 - ring finger = 3

For all of these examples each of the right hand fingerings will be as follows:
T will pull D string - 1 pulls G string, 2 pulls B string, 3 pulls thin E string.
Now try the following arpeggios with the open D, G, B, and thin E strings 
later I will add chords.
Once comfortable and smooth play these with your metronome at: 100 BPM 
(beats per minute)

1.)  T, 1, 2, 3, 2, 1   (repeat each arpeggio at least 20 to 100 times a day)

2.)  3, 2, 1, T, 2, 3 

3.) T, 1, T, 2, T, 3, T, 2



Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys. 

On guitar an easy way to transpose is by using a capo. It clamps around the neck and depending on which fret you put it determines which key your in.

 

 

 

 

All materials copyright 2010. 

For personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music



 

Finger Exercise For Guitar Part III

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I had a student ask me:

"My question relates to your picking exercises. In those exercises, you start each string with a down stroke and alternate between down and up picking. If I am doing a scale across all six strings (with that alternating method of picking), do I start on the next string with an upstroke if that is the next stroke in the sequence or do I begin each new string with a down stroke?"
The answer is you do continuous down up picking no matter what string your on.
If you complete a string - picking up - then the next picking direction will be down. 
And if you complete a string - picking down - then the next 
picking direction will be up. 

Now for a new exercise:
Start with 4th finger 12th fret thin E string - pick down
3rd finger 11th fret - pick up (remember to lift 4th finger)
back to 4th finger 12th fret - pick down
2nd finger 10th fret - pick up
back to 4th finger 12th fret - pick down
1st finger 9th fret - pick up

Remember to repeat this exercise 5 to 7 times each adjacent string.
Thin E, B, G, D, A, Thick E
Also once comfortable with this exercise add the metronome at 90 BPM - then gradually increase speed to 100, 110, 120 up to 220 BPM




Now repeat these exercises on all position (register) of your instrument.

 

All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

     

Finger Exercises For Guitar Part II

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After you warm up (see previous blog) do the following:
Starting on the thin E string place first finger first fret pick down -
holding first finger first fret - place 4th finger 4th fret pick up
place 3rd finger 3rd fret pick down (to hear 3rd finger you must lift 4th finger)
place back 4th finger 4th fret pick up
place 2nd finger 2nd fret pick down (remember to lift 4th finger)
place back 4th finger 4th fret pick up

Now repeat this same exercise 10 times each string - E, B, G, D, A, low E.

Remember once you are comfortable to use the metronome around 70 to 90 BPM.
Lets say you start at 70 BPM do this for 5 minutes, then go to 80 BPM for five minutes, 
then 90 BPM work up 220 BPM.

Also do all exercises using only up picking!
This is the weakest picking direction so it needs extra work.


Now repeat these exercises on all position (register) of your instrument.

 

All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Finger Exercises For Guitar Part I

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Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
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The next few lessons I will be focusing on finger exercises.
These will develop consistency, smoothness, dexterity and speed!

First lets warm up.
Starting with the thin E string - pick the string down then up in a continuous motion.
Remember to start slowly and then gradually build speed.
Do this approximately 150 to 200 times for each open string.
Once you are comfortable with this add the metronome starting around 90 BPM (beats per minute).

Exercise 1. Starting with your first finger on the fifth fret of the thin E string pick down.
Now while keeping the first finger down add your 2nd finger on the sixth fret of the thin E pick up. Then keeping down the 1st and 2nd finger add your your 3rd finger on the 7th fret of the thin E pick down. Now add your fourth finger on the 8th fret of the thin E string and pick up.
Now repeat this 5 to 10 times EACH string - E then B then G then D then A then low thick E string. 

Also once you are comfortable add the metronome around 70 to 90 BPM.
Lets say you start at 70 BPM do this for 5 minutes, then go to 80 BPM for five minutes, 
then 90 BPM work up 220 BPM.


Now transpose above to each (all frets) register of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

 

All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music




Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
http://www.amazon.com/GRAB-IT-Vince-Lauria/dp/1478714476

The following is intended for use with the C Minor Pentatonic Scale and also applies to all scales!
Make yourself stay in one octave at a time. So play your C Pentatonic Scale to your recorded rhythm tracks (see previous lessons) and limit yourself to two to seven notes at a time. When I first started to do this I would think this sucks I need more notes 
but in time I realized that it was me that was limited not the notes. 

Another important technique is for every melody or riff your create make three to seven variations of the same idea. This one technique alone has allowed me to write songs, create melodies and solos in abundance and quality. See examples below. Learn as given then create your own variations. Now the C Minor Pentatonic Scale the number formula is:
R, b3, 4, 5, b7, 8th/R or octave.

The notes would be:
C, Eb, F, G, Bb, C

Riff #1       (all examples given are using just the notes in the C Minor Pentatonic Scale)
Eb, C, G

Variation #1
G, C, G, Eb

Variation #2
G, Eb, C

Variation #3
Eb, C, Eb, C, G

Variation #4
G, Eb, G, Eb, G, C

Variation #5
C, G, Eb

Variation #6
G, Eb, G, C

Variation #7
G, G, G, G, Eb, G, G, G, G, C




Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

 

All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music



Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
http://www.amazon.com/GRAB-IT-Vince-Lauria/dp/1478714476


Record the following chord progressions to a metronome at 75 BPM 
for 5 to 10 minutes for each progression.

1. Cm //// 
    Ab //// 
    Bb ////  

2. Cm ////
    Fm ////
    Cm //// ////
    Ab /// 
    Gm ////

3. Fm ////
    Cm ////
    Fm ////
    Cm ////
    Ab ////
    Gm ////
    Bb //// ////

Record or have a friend play the above chord progressions in C then - play the single note C Minor Pentatonic Scale in all possible positions (registers) and octaves. 
Remember to first play quarter notes then later eight notes. 
For understanding notes values follow link then scroll to bottom of page: 2008.08.11: Family Of Chords - Song Writing 101
Remember to refrain from playing at a tempo where each
note is not performed clean and consistent. 
Once comfortable gradually increase speed and move to eighth notes


Another commonly used scale for the Blues is the Major Pentatonic Scale.
In the key of C the notes are:
C, D, E, G, A, C.

C maj pent.png

Learn in all positions and octaves - then apply all techniques in previous blogs to the Major Pentatonic Scale.

The Blues, Minor and Major Pentatonic scales are the three most commonly used scales!
So you must transpose these scales to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

 



All materials for personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Copyright © 2011

Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
http://www.amazon.com/GRAB-IT-Vince-Lauria/dp/1478714476

Now that you know the C Minor Pentatonic scale in all positions of your instrument lets learn some more chord progressions that go with the scale.
Again staying in the Key of C try the following chord progression.

Cm //// ////
Ab //// ////  record this progression to a metronome at 75 BPM for 5 to 10 minutes

Record or have a friend play the chord changes while you play the C Pentatonic Scale forms and the Riff ideas already covered. By the way the word: riff, melody or motif means the same thing. A melodic set of notes.

Next time more chords for C Pentatonic Scale!





Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

 

All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music





Applying the Minor Pentatonic Scale

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Record or have a friend play the following standard twelve bar blues in C then - play the single note C Minor Pentatonic Scale in all possible positions (registers) and octaves. Remember to first play quarter notes then later eight notes. For understanding notes values follow link then scroll to bottom of page: 2008.08.11: Family Of Chords - Song Writing 101
Remember to refrain from playing at a tempo where each note is not performed clean and consistent. 
Once comfortable gradually increase speed and move to eighth notes. 
 
Standard 12 Bar Blues in C:
C7 //// //// //// //// F7 //// //// C7 //// //// G7 //// F7 //// C7 //// G7 //// :|  

Now the C Minor Pentatonic Scale the number formula is:
R, b3, 4, 5, b7, 8th/R or octave.

The notes are:
C, Eb, F, G, Bb, C

Now we will use a technique called sequencing . That is using a specific number of notes from the scale 2 notes, 3 notes, 4 notes, 5 notes, 6 notes etc.  
Play descending or ascending up the scale (going up or down in tone). 
First doing the scale descending: 

Riff #1 = Eb, C, Bb
Riff #2 = C, Bb, G
Riff #3 = Bb, G, F
Riff #4 = G, F, Eb
Riff #5 = F, Eb, C
Riff #6 = Eb, C, Bb
Riff #7 = C, Bb, G
Riff #8 = Bb, G, F
Riff #9 = G, F, Eb
Riff #10 = F, Bb, C
 
1. Learn as is
2. Play up and back
3. Transpose to all keys.


Now apply this same technique with 2,4,5 and 6 note sequences.
Then later all scales.




Stay tuned,

Vince Lauria




Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

 

All materials for personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Copyright © 2011

The Minor Pentatonic Scale

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In addition to the Blues Scale the Minor Pentatonic Scale is used frequently!
You can substitute this scale for the Blues Scale or combine it with the blues 
scale to create great melodic soloing and vocal melodies.
 
The number formula is:
R, b3, 4, 5, b7, 8th/R or octave.
This formula is the same for all keys. 

The notes in the key of C would be:
C = R, Eb = b3, F=4, G = 5, Bb =b7, C = octave of root.

C m pent scale.png

Now memorize the number formula and corresponding note names.
Next time I will show you some fun examples with this scale.



Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

 



All materials for personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Copyright © 2011


Common Blues Riffs!

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Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
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Now that we know the Blues Scale and some of the most common Blues Chords lets do   
some common single (one note at a time) note riffs (common melodies).
Again staying in the key of C Blues do the following: 

Record the Standard 12 Bar Blues in C from previous blog. 
(if you do not know how to play these chords go to:
strumming at 60 BPM beats per minute using a metronome. 
(If you don't own a metronome go to: http://www.webmetronome.com/ ).

Record the chord for five to ten minutes then play back the chord while you play the following riffs using quarter notes or one note per click or beat. If you do not know the note names on the piano or the guitar use these links.  


Repeat each riff - five to fifteen times in a row till it starts to sound fluid and smooth.               
Now each riff is an octave above previous bar, same notes higher in tone:

Riff #1 = Eb, C, G 
Riff one.png
Riff #2 = G, Bb, C 
Riff two.png

Riff #3 = G, Bb, Eb, C
Riff three.png
 
Riff #4= Gb, F, Eb, C
Riff four.png


Create at least three variation of each riff. Do this by the following: play backwards, change order of notes, add vibrato, hammer ons and pull offs, also tap notes.

Record or have a friend play the following standard twelve bar blues in C - then play the single note Blues Scale in all possible positions (registers) and octaves. Remember to first play quarter notes then later eight notes. For understanding notes values follow this link then scroll to bottom of page: 2008.08.11: Family Of Chords - Song Writing 101
Remember to refrain from playing at a tempo where each note is not performed clean and consistent. 
Once comfortable gradually increase speed and later move to eighth notes. 
 
Standard 12 Bar Blues in C:
C7 //// //// //// //// F7 //// //// C7 //// //// G7 //// F7 //// C7 //// G7 //// :|  
                                           
Repeat progression twenty minutes or more.

Now transpose to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

 

All materials for personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Copyright © 2011




Fun with the Blues Scale!

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Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
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Last blog we learned the Blues Scale now lets learn some of the chords that go with the Blues Scale.                     Remember all examples are given in the key of C.
After you become familiar with the key of C you will want to transpose or move these chords and scale to other keys.

The most common chords that go with the C Blues scale are: C dominant seventh,               
F dominant seventh and G dominant seventh. Chords are commonly written in shorthand like this:
C7//// F7//// G7////. The lines after each of the chords are called hash marks each hash mark
represents one quarter note or one strum.

This is often referred to as a: one, four, five - chord progression. 
In our music shorthand = I, IV, V.
The reason we use shorthand is so one system is then used in all keys.
Now lets look at the notes to create each one of these chords.

C7 = R, 3rd, 5th, b7   Now the note names = C - E - G - Bb
F7 = R, 3rd, 5th, b7   Now the note names =  F - A - C - Eb
G7 = R, 3rd, 5th, b7   Now the notes names = G - B - D - F     Chords on musical staff:
               C7        F7        G7
BC 1.png
Now written on the musical staff the same exact three chords but in a different voicing.      
Voicing means how the notes are arranged and spaced. Many times a note is repeated in a chord.

              C7           F7         G7
     BC 2.png

Another commonly used voicing of the same exact three chords:
         
           C7          F7         G7  
 
BC 3.png            
Experiment creating your own voicings using the same notes.


Record or have a friend play the following standard twelve bar blues in C then - play the single note Blues Scale in all possible positions (registers) and octaves. Remember to first play quarter notes then later eight notes. For understanding notes values follow link then scroll to bottom of page: 2008.08.11: Family Of Chords - Song Writing 101
Remember to refrain from playing at a tempo where each note is not performed clean and consistent. 
Once comfortable gradually increase speed and move to eighth notes. 
 
Standard 12 Bar Blues in C:
C7 //// //// //// //// F7 //// //// C7 //// //// G7 //// F7 //// C7 //// G7 //// :|  
                                           
Repeat progression twenty minutes or more.

More fun with the Blues Scale later!



Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

 

All materials for personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Copyright © 2011


The Blues Scale

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Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
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One of the most commonly used scales in music besides the Major Scale is the Blues Scale.
Today lets learn it - then later I will show you ways to apply it.

First most scales are seven notes in a certain interval formula. 
(an interval is the distance between any two notes - more on this later)
What that means is out of the twelve notes in our musical system 
we usually use just seven of the twelve.

First lets review the number formula for a Major Scale:
R/1, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th/R or octave
The notes in the key of C are:
C,D,E,F,G,A,B,C
On musical staff:

C major scale.png

The Blues Scale number formulas is:
R1, b3rd, 4th, b5th, 5th, b7th, 8th/R or octave.
The notes in the key of C would be:
C, Eb, F, Gb, G, Bb, C
Written on musical staff:

Blues scale.png
As you learn any scale remember to play slowly up and down in tone. Make sure you use minimum finger movement and do not play faster then you can clearly. Make sure that your fingers and the pick are moving exactly synchronized. This prevents a flapping or flam sound.



Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

 

All materials for personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Copyright © 2011