July 2009 Archives

Song Writing 101 Part IV

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Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
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Today we will explore more common chord progressions.
Remember to reference  "Family of Chords - Song Writing 101 " blog.
Link: http://www.vincelauriamusic.com/blog/2008/08/family-of-chords-and-how-they.html

1) I, IV, V, IV or in the key of C major = C major, F major, G major, F major.

I, IV, V, IV.png

2) ii, V, I, vi or in the key of C major = D minor, G major, C major, A minor.

ii, V, I, vi.png

3) I, V, vi, IV or in the key of C major = C major, G major, A minor, F major.

I, V, vi, IV.png

4) I, IV, viio, iii, vi, ii, V, or in the key of C major = 
C major, F major, B diminished, E   minor, A minor, D minor, G major or G seventh.

I, IV, viio, iii, vi, ii, V.png




Play (strum) each chord for one measure or 4 beats. Loop record or have a friend play chords while you play all positions (modes) of the C major scale. First use quarter notes only for 10 minutes, then eighth notes only for 10 minutes. Remember once you are comfortable in all voicings of C major then you must transpose to all other keys.




ATB,

Vince 



Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

 

All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music




Song Writing 101 Part III

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Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
http://www.amazon.com/GRAB-IT-Vince-Lauria/dp/1478714476


Lets look at one of the most common chord combinations or 
more commonly called "PROGRESSIONS" used in contemporary music. 
Referencing the "Family of Chords - Song Writing 101 " blog lets take the C major scale 
and its harmonized family of chords and put it to work!

ii, V, I = The two or D minor chord the five or G major or G seventh chord and the one or 
C major chord. This is how it is written for a basic rhythm chart. The lines are called hash marks and are the same thing as a quarter note. Each chord gets four beats.

Dm //// G //// C ///// 

Example written on staff:
ii, V, I.png

Record or have a friend play this progression for 5 to 10 minutes 
while you play the C major scale using quarter then eight notes. 







Now transpose these to each position (register) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

 

All materials for personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Copyright © 2011 

Song Writing 101 Part II

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Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
http://www.amazon.com/GRAB-IT-Vince-Lauria/dp/1478714476

When writing a song there is a standard structure that is used. This structure is varied but basically it is like the following: 

Introduction ( usually instrumental 4 to 8 bars)
Verse (Singing starts. Many times it is the same chords as the Intro or Chorus 8 to 12 bars)
Pre chorus  (or Segway small instrumental section 2 to 4 bars - builds to next section)
Chorus (Many times the name of the song. Most remembered or hooky part)
Segway
2nd Verse (tells next part of story)
Chorus
Bridge (different then all other sections-breaks up song)
Solo (guitar, sax or piano etc.)
Chorus
Outro (variation on Introduction, slight variation or new key - modulation)





All materials for personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Copyright © 2011 


 

Bass Guitar Techniques

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Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
http://www.amazon.com/GRAB-IT-Vince-Lauria/dp/1478714476

To be a good bass player it is essential to be able to play with a pick and your fingers.

First when using a pick on bass I recommend the extra heavy ones.
For the bass to be heard in a band or in a recording situation the heavy pick will cut though.
Always use down up picking and start down.
When using your fingers remember to use alternate rest stroke. This means to pull the string with the first finger right hand and then rest it on the string directly above it. Practice going back & forth 1st, 2nd ,1st, 2nd and gradually increasing your speed. Stat with the open G string repeat 100 to 200 times. Then repeat same technique on D, A and E strings
Once comfortable put first finger on the ninth fret of the G string using first finger right hand pull string and immediately rest on the adjacent D string. Then leaving first finger on ninth fret put second finger left hand on tenth fret pull second finger right hand and rest on D again. Do this same process for the third and fourth fingers.
Then repeat exercise five to ten times each string - G, D, A and E. 
Then repeat exact exercise on the tenth though seventeenth frets. 
Then do descending ninth though first frets.



 

All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
http://www.amazon.com/GRAB-IT-Vince-Lauria/dp/1478714476

Today let's take the C major scale and its family of chords and see how we can connect the chords using scale note from C major. First take a basic open C major chord at first fret.
Our target chord will be the F major chord. Strum the C chord 2 times then walk up to the F chord using open D string then the E note 2nd fret of the D string, finally play the F major chord. Experiment going up & back. With the use of a capo transpose to each position (register or fret) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.




 

All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music

Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
http://www.amazon.com/GRAB-IT-Vince-Lauria/dp/1478714476

When playing common chords you can use scale tones to connect chords. This makes chord changes much more interesting and keeps the listener's interest from chord to chord like a bouncing ball.
Starting with a simple A major chord at the 2nd fret strum the chord down once, then add first finger to 2nd fret on the A string - while holding the A chord pick the B note. Then use third finger 4th fret A string and pick the C# note. You can use this to go to the D major chord. Next time I will cover doing this technique with other open chords. With the use of a capo transpose to each position (register or fret) of your instrument, then to all 15 keys.

 

All materials copyright 2010. For personal use only.

Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music


Buy "Grab It" by Vince Lauria the key to soloing and song writing:
http://www.amazon.com/GRAB-IT-Vince-Lauria/dp/1478714476


A good habit for any instrument is to warm up. On the guitar start by picking the open thin E string (E string closet to floor) approximately 150 to 200 times. Use down up picking - always start down towards floor unless otherwise indicated. Repeat this for each adjacent string - floor to ceiling - B, G, D, A, low thick E. 

Always play the guitar on your left leg and use a guitar strap adjust the strap so the guitar is supported above your left leg by one to two inches. Keep your left hand on the lower to middle of back of guitar neck this allows your fingers to play on the very tips of fingers.

Remember to keep finger as close to the fret board as possible.

Slide across neck try to minimize lifting finger completely off fret board. The pinky finger is on a separate muscle group so be patient as this finger wants to come away from fret board the most. Also use a metronome after you are comfortable with an exercise or song.

The general overall approach to studying music is always to start: slow - smooth - even and consistent. Give each note or chord the same attack or intensity. Once comfortable add the metronome starting at: 60 BPM (beats per minute). Do not increase speed until you can play clearly at each tempo. 

Then increase to: 70, 80 ,90, 100 continue to 220 BPM.

For your left foot use a phone book or foot stool available at your local music store. This helps maintain proper back and arm posture and allows your fingers to stay in the correct position for maximum speed, clarity and consistency. Also do exercises and songs all with up picking only! As this is usually the weakest picking direction in students.

It is very important to memorize all the natural note names ascending (up in tone) and descending (down in tone) for each string. The note names are the first seven letters of the alphabet repeated seven times  (octaves) for our musical system. A, B, C, D, E, F, G. All the notes are whole steps (two fret distance) except for EF-BC which are half steps (one fret distance). An easy way to remember this is: Elvis Fans Buy Cars. Memorize notes on one string at a time ascending and descending. Once you understand the note sequence on one string the remaining strings are easier because it is the same sequence or order just starting on a different note. Later learn the sharps and flats.

 

If you have a music instructor it is essential to keep going every week!

Many times a student will say I want to learn all the materials first then come back.

This is a myth because lessons are not just about learning new materials.

It is also to make sure you maintain proper hand position, fingering, posture and other important techniques. Many times bad habits are created and the student is not even aware of it. 

 

 

When strumming open chords within the first 3 frets of the guitar (near the nut) remember to always strum the open strings with less volume then the thinner strings and the fingered strings. Many times the open thicker strings are much louder the thin fingered strings.

Start strumming with quarter note strums - in groups of four strums: 1, 2, 3, 4, 1, 2, 3, 4 etc. etc.

All down strumming (towards floor).

Then do quarter note strums - in groups of two strums:

1,2, 1,2, 1,2, 1,2 etc. etc.

All down strumming.

 

Then do down, up strumming in eighth note strums:

1 and 2 and 3 and 4 and, etc, etc.


Down, up strumming (towards floor- towards ceiling)

Also get a get chord book and learn the most common open position chords.

G major, A minor, C major, D major, E minor, D minor and F major.

 

 

All materials for personal use only.

Copyright © 2012 Vince Lauria Sun and Earth Music  - ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

 

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